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BLOG No. 34. Do you know what are the FEI Rules for FALSE TAIL /TAIL EXTENSION ON DRESSAGE HORSES?

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September 19, 2018

BLOG No. 34. Do you know what are the FEI Rules for FALSE TAIL /TAIL EXTENSION ON DRESSAGE HORSES?

Many riders, owners and trainers sometimes feel that no matter how well they have taken care of their horses’ tails, before going to the shows, the feel that they have very little hair or in worst cases they have had injuries and have almost no hair at all.

Today I was asked if it was possible to use false tails or extensions in FEI events and what was the procedure to do it.

First, you have to take into consideration Article 428.6. of the Rules that state:

False tails/tail extensions are permitted only with the prior permission of the FEI. Requests for such permission should be directed to the FEI Dressage department accompanied by photographs and a veterinary certificate. False tails may not contain any metal parts, (except for hooks and eyelets), or extra added weight.”

Therefore, you should follow the Procedure required by the FEI Rules that is as follows:

  1. A request has to be made through the respective National Federation (the application must be sent to the FEI at least 3 weeks prior to the concerned event where the tale extension is needed).
  2. Information about horse to be supplied: Name and FEI passport number.
  3. Name and contact info of horse owner
  4. 2 recent clear photographs (digital or printed) showing the tail without extension/false tail, from behind and from the side.
  5. A Vet Certificate stating that the horse in question has injured its tail or has very little hair on its tail for other reasons.
  6. The request should be sent by email to : philippe.maynier@fei.org

 

Finally, you have to take the permission of the FEI to the Event, and show it to the FEI Steward before the Jog and have the extension ready and present it to the FEI officials performing the jog.

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International dressage judge and an FEI level dressage competitor. He is the first judge to be promoted through the new FEI 3 * program.

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